Advertisements
Home > My Thoughts, Strategy > My Way of Consulting- Part 2

My Way of Consulting- Part 2



(Please note, due to job/professional ethics and constraints, I cannot share the names of the clients and the exact details of the engagements. Also, these are purely my own views and my current organization or previous organizations I have worked for are not responsible for these views.)
As detailed in the earlier post, start the ground work for the engagement in the “Pre-Engagement” phase and then collect all data and facts in the “Discover Phase”. Once you have all the data, documents, responses to the questionnaires and templates, it’s time to start with the Analyze Phase.

Analyze Phase:

Analyze and Recommend phase are very subjective and differ from one engagement to another and one client to another. As a generic rule, I analyze the data and facts collected and divide it into three broad categories:

a) Strategic,
b) Operational and
c) Tactical.

The Strategic information gives the overall direction and the roadmap. The operational information gives the overview of the process and the rules that direct the operations and the tactical information gives the details of how each and every step (rules and exceptions) is performed in the processes.

The information/data gathered in the Discover Phase can also be majorly divided into “semantic” data and “non-semantic” data. The semantic data consists of documentation, articles, process charts, job schedules etc. This type of data has to read and interpreted. The interpretations from semantic data will majorly be subjective in nature.

The non-semantic data is generally transaction data. This type of data gives objective type of results. For example: If the client shares the data related to support tickets raised for different processes/ systems, the consultant can play with the data and infer on the volume of tickets for different processes/ systems, severity of these tickets and most important, can apply the 80-20 and/or other rules to arrive at the recommendations.

Recommend Phase:

As stated earlier in the analyze section, the Recommend and Analyze phases overlap and for most of the engagements, by the end of the analyze phase, the consultant should start forming the rudiments of recommendations.

The recommendations should be governed by the following three factors:

a) Goals and Objectives
b) Key drivers to achieve these objectives and
c) Expected results/ benefits

The Goals and Objectives of the exercise are the final state that the client wants to be in. The Key Drivers are the propellants as well as the stepping stones to achieve the stated Goals and Objectives. The consultant should be aware of and explicitly state the results and the benefits which client will avail due to the recommendations.

The recommendations can be based on either extrapolation of existing resources to achieve the future state or bridging the gap between the current state and the future state. More often than not, it is a mix of both Extrapolation and Bridging the Gap.

Extrapolation:
The recommendations in extrapolations mainly consider the available resources and how the client can make use of these resources to achieve the desired results. A few examples of this type of exercise are: Restructuring the present team structure, Optimization of the current processes, redistributions and reallocation of current costs and revenues etc.

Bridging the Gap:
The “Bridging the Gap” scenario requires an analysis of the gap between the current state and the future state. The recommendations should have the steps, resources and the plan to bridge this gap. This might include the use of existing resources or acquisition of new resources.

More often than not, the recommendations are a mix of the above two scenarios. The consultant must keep in mind the Feasibility of the recommendations with respect to scope and budget and the Compatibility of the recommendations with respect to the organizational goals and objectives.

Presentation:

An important (if not the most important) part of a consulting exercise is the presentation of findings and the recommendations. Besides other sections, the recommendations report must consist of the following:

Key Findings:
Present the Key Findings which need the attention of the client. These findings should be the ones tackling which will play an important part in achieving the desired results. It is best to identify a few areas of concern and give the rating of their health status. If possible, back these key findings with data, it gives more credibility to the claims.

Current State and Future State:
Explicitly state the current and the future state of the concern areas. Also state the “delta” in the two states. This will help the client understand the need for the resources required to fill the gap.

Recommendations:
The most important part of the report is the recommendations section. Club the recommendations into logical groups and maintain the flow so that it is easy for the audience to understand.
Segregate the recommendations for Strategic, Operational and Tactical levels of management. If, possible, identify the audience/ resources for each section of the recommendations. This will help in ease of implementation of the recommendations.

Execution Guidelines:
The recommendations section give the “What to do?” part where as the Execution guidelines should give the “How to do?” part of the recommendations. The execution section should give the steps required to implement the recommendations as well as their tentative timelines or durations.

Conclusion:
In the conclusion section give a brief snapshot of the current pain points, the reasons for those pain points and the resolution of these pain areas with the recommendations provided. Also, specify the results or benefits achieved at the end of the implementation of the recommendations. The results should align with the goals and objectives set at the beginning of the exercise.

Advertisements
  1. November 28, 2010 at 11:23 pm

    very well written article, bro !!

  2. Harshdeep Rapal
    January 3, 2011 at 8:46 am

    Thanks a lot Apoorv.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: